r/news Sep 29 '22 Helpful 1 All-Seeing Upvote 1

U.S. charges ex-Army major and his wife over alleged plot to leak military health data to Russia Soft paywall

https://www.reuters.com/world/us/us-charges-ex-army-major-his-wife-over-alleged-plot-leak-military-health-data-2022-09-29/
55.1k Upvotes

10.0k

u/cavscout37 Sep 29 '22

May as well call them spies.

5.5k

u/Grogosh Sep 29 '22 Eureka!

Dunno we have a habit of charging people that leak stuff to russia as traitors. We even executed a couple of them once.

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u/MrSpiffenhimer Sep 29 '22

Those are the real good ole days. When spies and traitors were treated as such.

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u/WeirdlyStrangeish Sep 29 '22 All-Seeing Upvote Wholesome Seal of Approval Table Slap

Boy the way Glen Miller played

songs that made the hit parade

Boys like me we had it made

Those were the days.

Russian spies weren't presidents

My car was new not full of dents.

Conspiracies weren't political bents

Those were the days

Miscarriage wasn't murder then

We could all watch Gentle Ben

Those were the days!

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u/Bookish4269 Sep 29 '22

Stifle, Edith, stifle!

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u/natenate22 Sep 29 '22

Nice job, Meathead.

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u/Yoko-Ohno_The_Third Sep 29 '22

I read that as Methhead at first

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u/magicwuff Sep 29 '22

You aren't alone.

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u/youstolemyname Sep 29 '22

And now half the government is on Russia's payroll

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u/o_MrBombastic_o Sep 29 '22

It's not the money, it helps but they actually are fully against western modern values and democracy.

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u/steamplshel Sep 29 '22

An entire political party even!

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u/FiendishHawk Sep 29 '22

When spies for Russia were left-wing, they got the electric chair. Now they are right-wing, they get the comfy chair.

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u/DamnYouRichardParker Sep 29 '22

And Nazis. We also used to execute Nazis.

I miss the good old days to.

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u/Top-Ambassador-4981 Sep 29 '22

We also brought them over here to work for the government on rockets.

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u/WilliamPoole Sep 29 '22

They could have just taken trains or jets. Did they need to get them THAT quickly?

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u/Agenda_Poster Sep 29 '22

Operation Paperclip. We were incredibly lenient towards Nazis.

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u/HojMcFoj Sep 29 '22

We didn't execute nazis, we hired them

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u/RainyCloudist Sep 29 '22

The moon was right there, taunting us! What were we supposed to do? Not hire nazis?!

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u/drew101 Sep 29 '22

operation. paperclip was a bitch.

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u/WillDeletOneDay Sep 29 '22

The U.S. very rarely convicts people of treason, and even when we do, execution is even more rare.

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u/Phaedryn Sep 29 '22

This.

It's primarily because it is exceedingly difficult to get a conviction for Treason, as it is the one crime clearly defined, along with the requirements to convict, in the US Constitution.

The Espionage Act exists for this very reason.

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u/notcaffeinefree Sep 29 '22

The US has never executed anyone as a result of a treason conviction. States have (for treason against the state), but the federal government never has.

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u/Galaxy_Ranger_Bob Sep 29 '22

The U.S. government has never executed anyone for treason.

The small handful of people who have been convicted of the offense at the federal level — such as two militants from the Whiskey Rebellion (John Mitchell and Philip Weigel, who were both pardoned by President George Washington) and several people after World War II — have mostly been pardoned or released.

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u/Blackbart42 Sep 29 '22

I guess technically Conspiracy to commit espionage is a different charge, but I would count it as a type of treason.

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u/Darkdoomwewew Sep 29 '22

And then we elected one president lmao.

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u/ProgressivePessimist Sep 29 '22

Also consider this

The indictment alleges that the plot started after Russian President Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine.

So that was about 7 months ago. How many months did it take for our government to figure out what was going on? That seems like a reasonable timeline.

Any leaked data is bad, but I think it's nothing in comparison to nuclear and classified weapons documents. We've known Trump has documents since leaving the white house last year. Tell me again why he hasn't been charged yet and walking free?

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u/SoldierofNotch Sep 29 '22

How many months did it take for our government to figure out what was going on?

0 months. If you read the article you'll find their "Russian contact" was an undercover fbi agent. The information never left American hands and the idiots professed their loyalty to Russia while handing over the documents.

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u/cornflake289 Sep 29 '22 edited Sep 29 '22

Tell me again why he hasn't been charged yet and walking free?

Because if you accept that a president (even a former one) is the most powerful person in the world. And then add to the fact that he's "rich"...well all the other powerful and rich people are desperately trying to hold onto a status quo wherein they are continually not held responsible for wrongdoing. If Trump goes down, none of them are safe... Its pretty simple to see, but extremely difficult to fight.

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u/SporkOfThor Sep 29 '22

Presumably this is also why we're not seeing associates of Epstein charged with raping minors. We are becoming, more and more, a nation of men, and not of laws. This is how empires fall.

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u/Galaxy_Ranger_Bob Sep 29 '22

Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were convicted, and executed, for espionage, not treason.

No person has been executed for treason by the federal government under the U.S. Constitution. The small handful of people who have been convicted of the offense at the federal level — such as two militants from the Whiskey Rebellion (John Mitchell and Philip Weigel, who were both pardoned by President George Washington) and several people after World War II — have mostly been pardoned or released.

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u/taez555 Sep 29 '22

At what point am I supposed to stop saying to someone like this... "Thank you for your service."? Before or after they've convicted?

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u/sckurvee Sep 29 '22

As a veteran, just don't say it... It's weird, and idk how to react when people say it lol. I got to do fun things, met cool people, went cool places... had to do some shitty things, too, but in the end I got paid pretty well for it all.

There's no rule that says you can't serve if you're a shitbag. I've served w/ plenty of them. Knowing that they soak up the "thank you for your service" to this day bothers me lol.

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u/metameh Sep 29 '22

"Thank you, taxpayer."

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u/taez555 Sep 29 '22

Yup. Military brat myself. Numerous family members in the service. Been immersed in it for near 5 decades. Also have several close relatives in the JAG. Not everyone is a saint. Not everyone is a hero. Especially when I've seen my sibling prosecute a general for rape, or soldiers for murder. The blanket every soldier is a hero and "Thank you for your service" just seems odd in that context.

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u/bigjohnminnesota Sep 29 '22

“Thank you for your pre-criminal service prior to your current incarceration, sir.”

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u/BrownEggs93 Sep 29 '22

Or whatever trump's been called over his lifetime. God knows how much he told.

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u/WhnWlltnd Sep 29 '22

We will never know what happened in Helsinki.

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u/BrownEggs93 Sep 29 '22

Assume the worst. And it's probably worse than that.

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u/iAmTheHYPE- Sep 29 '22

We would if Congress did their fucking job and subpoenaed Marina Gross, the American translator. But no, can't have that.

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u/Soonyulnoh2 Sep 29 '22

In 2017 a dozen Russian Diplomats were killed after Trump leaked info that they were USA assets.

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u/__mud__ Sep 29 '22

Trump leaked info

Oh, you mean "declassified with a thought"

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u/blurplethenurple Sep 29 '22 Bravo!

Need a source on Trump having thoughts

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u/chili_cheese_dogg Sep 29 '22

He thought nuking hurricanes would be a way to control them.

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u/GadisRKO Sep 29 '22

Such stable, much genius.

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u/chubbysumo Sep 29 '22

Rump didn't leak that info, he handed it over to them. Sold out our allies.

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u/chef-nom-nom Sep 29 '22

Way to throw your life away for literally nothing.

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u/debo16 Sep 29 '22

Threw their life away just so Russia could learn which soldiers in FORSCOM needed dental work done.

Lol

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u/mr_impastabowl Sep 29 '22

The reason Russia (or any foreign actor) would want health data is to identify targets with valuable access or information that may need expensive medical operations or have terminal illnesses.

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u/Conscious-Holiday-76 Sep 29 '22

Which is weird for active duty dependents because Tricare covers quite a bit even if you don't use Tricare prime

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u/newluna Sep 29 '22

Terminal illness though? “We can help you really take care of your family after you’re gone.”

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u/xeroze1 Sep 29 '22

It's like having bad medical welfare for veterans is a national security risk or something

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u/mr_impastabowl Sep 29 '22

Active duty military actually has really good benefits. And a veteran probably wouldn't have the same clearance or access that an enemy state would want or need.

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u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22

[deleted]

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u/kendrickshalamar Sep 29 '22

The two met with someone whom they believed was a Russian official, but in fact was actually an FBI undercover agent, the indictment says.

what is this, Burn After Reading?

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u/Mortar_Maggot Sep 29 '22

The more you read the declassified history of intelligence work, the more you realize that movie is a documentary.

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u/pilesofcleanlaundry Sep 29 '22

Fiction can never be as stupid as real life.

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u/getefix Sep 29 '22

We have your shit

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u/T8ert0t Sep 29 '22 edited Sep 29 '22

I thought you might be worried

About the security

Of

Your shittttttt

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u/hlorghlorgh Sep 29 '22

"They all seem to be sleeping with each other"

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u/bbcversus Sep 29 '22

I got his numbah, I got his numbah!

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u/PooveyFarmsRacer Sep 29 '22

We learned not to do it again, whatever it was

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u/mikeydel307 Sep 29 '22

I'm fucked if I know what we did.

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u/Pliny_the_middle Sep 29 '22

I thought you might be worried, about the security, of, your shit.

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u/Liet-Kinda Sep 29 '22

What did we learn, Palmer?

I don't know, sir.

I don't fucking know either. I guess we learned not to do it again.

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u/your_actual_life Sep 29 '22

David Rasche is the best. Will take any opportunity to promote the fact that most episodes of Sledge Hammer! are on YouTube. Classic show.

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u/ThisIsAWorkAccount Sep 29 '22

Also fantastic in Succession

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u/GraveRobb Sep 29 '22

F*cked if I know what we did...

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u/ProstetnicVogonJelz Sep 29 '22

Great ending scene. I remember immediately rewatching that scene the first time seeing the movie.

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u/eriksrx Sep 29 '22

It's just FBI undercover agents, all the way down.

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u/Throwdaway543210 Sep 29 '22

It’s just FBI undercover agents, all the way down.

After Carnivore (or whatever they renamed it) turned out to be a real thing, I'm just gonna go ahead and assume that if I'm doing dirt, the government knows about it, and is gonna have undercover FBI intercept if it's that dangerous of a crime. And if someone is doing that big of a crime, one should assume everyone is FBI, or affiliated with.

Sort of like in WW2, where the game was already won and over after British Intelligence cracked Enigma. Everything after that, they knew everything that was going on. They just had to play like they didn't.

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u/IDUnavailable Sep 29 '22

Osbourne Cox? I thought you might be worried... about the security... of your shit.

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u/GraveRobb Sep 29 '22

Did the wife need the money for cosmetic surgery?

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u/ruizach Sep 29 '22

I'm sorry I'm calling you at such an hour. But I thought you'd be worried... about the security... of your shit.

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u/Bgrngod Sep 29 '22

Apparently Henry had some reservations about providing healthcare data, saying it would violate the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)

Treason? Yeah's fine I suppose, but violating HIPAA gives me some concerns!

Wowza.

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u/Commander_Keller Sep 29 '22

I like the part where his wife told the "russian agent" that her husband is a coward, and that she violated HIPAA all the time.

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u/Liet-Kinda Sep 29 '22

Christ, lady, ever hear of couples therapy?

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u/SH1TSTORM2020 Sep 29 '22

She probably doesn’t trust HIPPA enough to go to therapy.

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u/WorkinName Sep 29 '22

I wouldn't either have you seen the size of their mouths and teeth? No siree Bob none for me thanks.

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u/TaskForceCausality Sep 29 '22

In a subsequent Aug. 24 meeting, she told the undercover agent her husband was a "coward" to be concerned about violating HIPAA, but she violated the law "all the time" and she would see to it that they could provide Russia with access to medical records from Fort Bragg patients.

I suspect her soon-to-be-ex husband was secretly glad the FBI arrested him. Being in a maximum security jail sounds like a better fate then trying to divorce such a person. Or being married to them.

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u/Kozy_Bear Sep 29 '22

You don’t understand how most military wives are, or the military’s mental health infrastructure.

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u/NehzQk Sep 29 '22

I don’t like that part. I don’t like any of it. The whole thing is disgusting. They’re traitors plain and simple.

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u/thinkthingsareover Sep 29 '22

As a disabled army veteran this whole thing has me really kinda on edge, worried....just fucking pissed off honestly and the worst part is I know there's nothing I can do about it.

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u/J3musu Sep 29 '22

Makes me wonder if he did it to try to impress his wife before she left him. Frankly, I think I'd choose divorce over going to prison for treason, but hey, to each his own I guess.

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u/E_D_D_R_W Sep 29 '22

Granted, most hospital onboarding sessions spend much more time on HIPAA than the laws on treason.

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u/TheBelhade Sep 29 '22

Hell, I have to do full courses on HIPAA yearly... and I'm a computer repair tech.

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u/iwatchcredits Sep 29 '22

How often you do the treason course?

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u/TheBelhade Sep 29 '22

Data security and protection is also yearly, but state secrets never comes up.

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u/ArchmageXin Sep 29 '22

Perish the thought.

I already got CPA ethnics, Sexual Harassment training, State mandated harassment training, HIPPA, that Cali data security thing, the EU Data security thing, Pandemic/Fire/natural disaster/Alien Invasion training, cyber security training, anti-money laundering training.

CAN WE NOT ADD ANOTHER COURSE ALREADY???

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u/iwatchcredits Sep 29 '22

Stop doing treason and we wont need the course

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u/GMWQ Sep 29 '22

I did a course on HIPAA yesterday.

I work in IT.

In Ireland

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u/winmace Sep 29 '22

Yeah but Ireland is the new India when it comes to tech support call centers

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u/GMWQ Sep 29 '22

Hey now as someone who worked in tech support... You're not entirely wrong

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u/the_other_b Sep 29 '22

"I may have committed some light treason.."

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u/SofieTerleska Sep 29 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

At another meeting later that day, Henry told the undercover agent he too was committed to Russia, and claimed he had even contemplated volunteering to join the Russian army.

"The way I am viewing what is going on in Ukraine now, is that the United States is using Ukrainians as a proxy for their own hatred toward Russia," he allegedly told the agent.

Other news stories make it clear that Henry is trans (or at least was seven years ago, I guess it's possible they detransitioned). How the hell was joining the Russian army supposed to go?

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u/ScottColvin Sep 29 '22

At a hotel in Baltimore on Aug. 17, Gabrielian told the undercover agent "she was motivated by patriotism toward Russia to provide any assistance she could to Russia, even if it meant being fired or going to jail," the indictment says.

In the meeting, she volunteered to bring her husband into the scheme, saying he had information about prior military training the United States provided to Ukraine, among other things

And it gets dumber and dumber from there.

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u/LatrellFeldstein Sep 29 '22

Well, yeah. We prosecute people for violating HIPAA.

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u/ULTRAFORCE Sep 29 '22

Okay, but you are going to have to answer to the Coca-Cola Company!

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u/cheeseburgervanhalen Sep 29 '22

I used to work for a large EHR vendor. It's basically impossible to pull data out of the electronic health system without some background processes monitoring all of your clicks. You'd get caught for this pretty quick at most facilities on the electronic side, but it also really stands out if you're writing down information manually outside of the existing system since everyone else is on their computer.

To the extent that it's possible, it's hard to smuggle PHI out of the hospital and transfer it (eg Elaine trying to get her chart in an episode of Seinfeld). Obviously you could get it out, but unless you're doing it from memory, there's likely going to be security footage/electronic footprints that lead back to you during a regular audit

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u/CherryHaterade Sep 29 '22

People have seen the punishment for violating HIPAA. The law has teeth and has been let loose to bite violators.

I used to wonder about why people got executed in public, and this is why. If you saw someone lose their head for espionage, it might make you reconsider.

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u/hallese Sep 29 '22

We've all got ADHD, sleep apnea, and bad knees. You're welcome.

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u/Musicman1972 Sep 29 '22 Looking

Are you keeping the tinnitus a state secret?

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u/Starbucks__Lovers Sep 29 '22 edited Sep 29 '22

Apparently Henry had some reservations about providing healthcare data, saying it would violate the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the indictment says

“I can excuse being a traitor to my country to support an enemy of the United States, but I draw the line at violating HIPAA”

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u/JohnnyMiskatonic Sep 29 '22 Helpful

That is a weird standard. “Sure, fuck the constitution but what of my beloved HIPAA?”

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u/jkrushal Sep 29 '22

He's just trying to use it as an excuse to not get involved. He had his doubts but he ended up getting sucked in. It makes the story a little more complicated for the prosecution. In the end the wife should definitely be in jail, but it's more complicated for him.

Clearly he's guilty of other things though. Like knowing his wife was selling US information to a Russian spy or even knowing about a Russian spy without reporting it at work.

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u/benbernards Sep 29 '22

man he really Britta'd that one..

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u/cosmoceratops Sep 29 '22

Ugh, Britta's in this?

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u/sax6romeo Sep 29 '22

She’s a GD B

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u/Half_Full_Hierophant Sep 29 '22

Someone did their mandated HIPAA training but not their mandated Treason training.

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u/Patralex Sep 29 '22

“You can excuse being a traitor?”

God, I love Community

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u/lillychr14 Sep 29 '22

They both believe the US is at war with Russia and both announced their intent to give aid to Russia. I know there’s a word for this. Starts with a T….

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u/DeepRoot Sep 29 '22

... and rhymes with "waiter".

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u/GSXRbroinflipflops Sep 29 '22 Wholesome

Taters.

Buncha taters! 🥔

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u/Sinsley Sep 29 '22

Boil them, mash them, stick them in a stew.

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u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22 edited Sep 29 '22

Boy do I feel stupid, I was gonna say Twaitor

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u/GSXRbroinflipflops Sep 29 '22

twaitor - a contraction of ‘twas and waiter that serves as the past tense form of waiter

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u/vexpopped Sep 29 '22

What kind of people want to share sensitive military data with a country that tries to murder thier neighbors?

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u/nowhathappenedwas Sep 29 '22

Seems like the plot was led by Gabrelian, who speaks Russian and feels "patriotic" towards Russia:

During an initial Aug. 17 meeting in a Baltimore hotel room, Gabrielian told the undercover agent that “she was motivated by patriotism toward Russia to provide any assistance she could to Russia, even if it meant being fired or going to jail.”

Her spouse had access to not just medical information, she said, but insight into how the U.S. military establishes an army hospital in war conditions and about training the military provided to Ukrainian military personnel. Henry participated in a second meeting later that night.

“My point of view is until the United States actually declares war against Russia, I’m able to help as much as I want,” Henry told the undercover agent, according to the indictment. “At that point, I’ll have some ethical issues I’ll have to work through.”

“You’ll work through those ethical issues,” Gabrielian replied.

In an Aug. 24 meeting with the undercover agent at a Baltimore hotel room, Gabrielian called Henry a “coward” for being concerned about violating the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA,) a federal law that limits the disclosure of patients’ confidential medical information.

Gabrielian is listed as an instructor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at Hopkins, and her profile page says she speaks Russian.

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u/CapgrasDelusion Sep 29 '22

“she was motivated by patriotism toward Russia to provide any assistance she could to Russia, even if it meant being fired or going to jail.”

Your wish is granted. You'll get both.

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u/atetuna Sep 29 '22

A two for one deal. Twice. That's good value.

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u/fizzle_noodle Sep 29 '22

Doesn't she also lose her license to practice medicine for violating HIPAA. So now she is going to jail AND when she gets out, she won't be able to teach or practice medicine- LOL

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u/Armani_8 Sep 29 '22

Also she's a known traitor to the country. Only employment she'll ever find in the states is as a republican convention speaker.

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u/haigins Sep 29 '22

Judging by her last name she very well could be of Armenian ancestry which could help explain her loyalty to Russia.

Source: Am Armerian, and no, personally no love for Russia.

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u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22

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u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22

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u/Teepeeforyourbung Sep 29 '22

She was giving information on how the US sets up field hospitals? LOL. Outside of the health data, She was selling literally worthless information considering there are literal field manuals online that teach this by the book..

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u/leathebimbo Sep 29 '22

Actually, the U.S. military has procedures regarding such that are considered tactical secrets so that enemies can't easily guess where to aim bombs if they decide to attack our medics.

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u/No_Reaction303 Sep 29 '22

It’s been a couple of years, but there was a soldier at Fort Stewart trying to sell field manuals to the Taliban. Turns out he was actually talking to the FBI. Threw his life away for something that’s generally not classified and easy to find on google.

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u/theaviationhistorian Sep 29 '22

Reminds me of when Ernest Hemingway was an asset for the KGB, even though his intel wasn't that great. He was cut also off because even the Russians thought he was more of a liability than a benefit for them.

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u/TheCalamity305 Sep 29 '22 edited Sep 29 '22

Wtf? Hemingway was KGB asset? 🤯

Edit: Damn it’s true he was a NKVD asset albeit a shitty one.

http://www.history.com/.amp/news/was-ernest-hemingway-a-spy

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u/theaviationhistorian Sep 29 '22

True. I keep getting them mixed up since the NKVD turned into the KGB because they changed into the MVD in 1946 & branched off as KGB in 1953. Hemingway was into a lot of things. He might be one of the few authors whose life overshadows his own novels. And his home in Key West is amazing, especially when walking around the colony of six-toed cats he & his family grew.

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u/TheCalamity305 Sep 29 '22

It’s funny because I knew Hemingway was OSO and FBI but and I live in Miami and go to key west quite often and been to his home … but this party of his life they leave out. It just blew my mind.

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u/OminousOnymous Sep 29 '22 edited Sep 29 '22

A small but disturbing number of American cultural heroes were Stalinists.

Woodie Guthrie was banned from a left wing San Franscisco radio station for singing a song celebrating the working man's victory that was the Moltov-Ribbentrop pact (Hitler and Stalin's agreement to divide up Poland.)

Dalton Trumbo, who spent his life whining about being blacklisted from Holywood, was more than happy to see Stalin blacklisting people from life.

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u/theaviationhistorian Sep 29 '22

Many of my educated family members in the 1920s & 30s were socialists. It seemed like a valid change from capitalism, especially with social reforms barely happening 2 generations before. It wasn't until after WWII that a lot of information & horror regarding Leninism & Stalinism started becoming public in the west.

Looking at the notes (and talking to elders before they passed) family members, I saw how they went through the decades from singing The Internationale on weekends to following things like the Non-Aligned Movement & pan-Arabism (which started hopeful but didn't fare well either as the final straw led to Ba'athism & Saddam Hussein).

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u/Liet-Kinda Sep 29 '22

Eh, it’s Russia, they have plenty of experience humoring grandiose old souses.

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u/Purple_Routine1297 Sep 29 '22

The word you’re looking for is “traitor”

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u/Rowsdower84 Sep 29 '22

Don’t forget “sympathizer.”

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u/theaviationhistorian Sep 29 '22

Sleazy, greedy, & psychotic people. The last few years I've seen that the US is bursting at the seams with this kind of lot.

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u/shanghairolls99 Sep 29 '22

Traitor, thats waiting for a large paycheck (that may never come)

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u/LordCornwalis Sep 29 '22

I suspect it may be hard to cash that check from Leavenworth…

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u/Dandan0005 Sep 29 '22

After googling the officer, an odd element to the story is that the officer (Jamie Lee Henry) is apparently the first trans officer in the US military and they identify as female, even though this article refers to them as male multiple times.

They apparently have had a rough few years and were even homeless (?) for a time despite being a doctor…

It sounds to me like there may be some mental health issues going on here, and the wife (a new wife, apparently, as Henry is described as going through a messy divorce) may have taken advantage of Henry’s instability.

Not really sure what’s going on here though.

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u/ADarwinAward Sep 29 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

And get this

Henry lamented in another interview that year about the lack of privacy afforded transgender people receiving medical care.

Then they turned around and tried to give out medical info on military members. What a hypocrite. How could you go through that level of vulnerability and fear and then turn around and divulge info on all your fellow soldiers?

https://freebeacon.com/national-security/trans-army-doctor-indicted-for-trying-to-give-soldiers-medical-info-to-russia/amp/

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u/SorenLain Sep 29 '22

Especially to a regime that would happily oppress and incarcerate people like you. Absolute insanity.

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u/Scarlett_Story Sep 29 '22

Not oppress and incarcerate. LGBTQ are routinely murdered in Russia.

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u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22

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u/supercyberlurker Sep 29 '22 Gold

Can be used for blackmail in some cases.

In other cases can be used as leverage, you see someone's family has a lot of medical issues and bills.. well, they might be a little more open to some financial help, in return for a favor..

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u/WolfsLairAbyss Sep 29 '22

Wasn't this the beginning plot to Star Trek Into Darkness?

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u/Chitown2181 Sep 29 '22

Lol yep. Khan saves that guys daughter and in return he blows up the secret military place. Good flick.

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u/Ok_Reception_8844 Sep 29 '22

Great assessment. I never considered that. Especially the latter. It's not about the records themselves. It's about what they tell you. You don't want to start "phishing" for double agents by making contact with anyone and everyone. You would target desperate people who need the $.

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u/psychopythonmetrist Sep 29 '22

Yeah it’s a common tactic. They’ll even follow peoples’ social media and see what they post. So if someone is posting about their parent/partner dealing with cancer/illness they know they have some leverage over that person.

It’s wild so many people post that kind of thing publicly.

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u/Catshit-Dogfart Sep 29 '22

Also why financial instability is a reason for denying security clearance.

One might truly believe they would never divulge information for any reason - until they're looking at a "gift" in the exact amount of their underwater mortgage.

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u/fr0d0bagg1ns Sep 29 '22

This 100%, we had guys that were perfect fits for open positions, and we couldn't hire them due to a divorce or medical situations flagging them as a security risk.

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u/Dunhildar Sep 29 '22

"Can't wait to go on holiday"

Fun fact, most home breaking are done by people that knows you, and what you own.

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u/psychopythonmetrist Sep 29 '22 edited Sep 29 '22

Yup! That type of thing is dumb too. Post your vacation pics AFTER you get back home. Don’t advertise an empty home lol

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u/crewserbattle Sep 29 '22

Sounds like a better Healthcare system might benefit national security too

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u/nwoh Sep 29 '22

Those opposed don't wanna hear that

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u/SoCuteShibe Sep 29 '22

I imply no support of Russia in saying this, but they do seem to be good at extrapolating powerful insights from data. Well, when the data is good.

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u/Jack_Kentucky Sep 29 '22

That doesn't really narrow it down in the U.S. military

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u/theaviationhistorian Sep 29 '22

Before February, I would've argued the same. These days, even info on the basics of improving your soldier's welfare is a leg up for the Russian military. I honestly believe they have brass whom wouldn't even see any info on this unless it came from intelligence documents. And I say this because we have brass in the Pentagon & elsewhere that are that stubborn!

Hell, I've seen Youtube videos from veterans saying how to care for a platoon or oneself while deployed (physically & mentally) that would've helped the Russian military. Fortunately, Ukraine did listen & learn from us.

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u/supercyberlurker Sep 29 '22

I'd agree that Russia turned out to not be the dire wolf we thought it was.

Instead of master spies, intelligence, and military... we found out it really was just a jumped up chihuahua with gas.

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u/DragonCat88 Sep 29 '22

There is a reason financial records are huge part of obtaining any sort of Security Clearance through any semblance of the normal channels. Security Clearances expire, but are not revoked upon separation. AD individuals likely have much better access but I still have a Secret Security Clearance, though have not needed it in the years since I Retired early.

I’m 100% Service Connected but it’s still difficult as the reason I am makes working full time not really a thing I can do. Others have the same issue with lower and even any disability ratings at all. I dunno know how anyone would go about it but connections don’t just vanish either.

It’s also a bit easier to get cleared if you’ve already been through the process. It wouldn’t have to be immediate treason either, but a sort of sleeper cell, I guess. Give them some money find them an advantageous position “incase they’re needed someday” which maybe never and blah blah blah.

Sorta like what they did with Trump.

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u/MillianaT Sep 29 '22

Imagine what a data scientist could do with the info. Not just individual targeting tactics for developing more spies (who might have financial or medical weaknesses), but knowing what types of medical concerns people in different military branches and positions are likely to have in general.

Plus knowing exactly who gets inoculated for what when traveling where.

There’s always a value to data, and data en masse reveals trends.

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u/Ramental Sep 29 '22 edited Sep 29 '22

To be fair, this time it was an FBI agent that pretended to be a Russian agent. Basically they found someone who WOULD sell the data to an enemy if such opportunity appeared.

Usually such agents are sent to those who are suspected of being a sympathizer of the enemy state or who is likely to be a traitor already, but catching red-handed is way higher than plugging an impostor and putting a bait. Sure, I imagine sometime it may be a rumor or snitching that makes a person a target of such check.

Of course in theory one could think "100k for a stupid data of who's injured? Easy money". It's still a betrayal. And if something it too good to be true, probably it is.

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u/TecumsehSherman Sep 29 '22

These two apparently reached out to the Russian Embassy first. So they tried to commit treason, but were intercepted.

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u/ShyKid5 Sep 29 '22

Russia was never involved, that's the funniest part, they contacted someone they thought was a Russian Spy but it was an undercover FBI Agent.

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u/Blue_Plastic_88 Sep 29 '22

Holy crap, both of them doctors, one an anesthesiologist, and willing to give Russia personal health information on their patients. What a couple of pieces of lowlife shit. If they love Russia so much and are so loyal to it, why didn’t they just go LIVE there?

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u/Dasnoosnoo Sep 29 '22

'Potential traitors' or 'spies' are the descriptor they're looking for there.

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u/Semaaaj Sep 29 '22

"At another meeting later that day, Henry told the undercover agent he too was committed to Russia, and claimed he had even contemplated volunteering to join the Russian army."

See the meat grinder over there, i really would like to go join the cannon fodder!

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u/jjusmc3531 Sep 29 '22

"she was motivated by patriotism toward Russia to provide any assistance she could to Russia, even if it meant being fired or going to jail," the indictment says.

🎉 guess where you are going? 🎉

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u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22

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u/sarcastroll Sep 29 '22

Imagine if you know which people in positions of trust have inoperable tumors, which ones have a kid that needs a life saving treatment but can't afford it.

That's valuable information on who might be able to be bought.

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u/thisonesforthetoys Sep 29 '22

And why would any Russian want the health records of US soldiers?

Analyzing Readiness.

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u/ruttin_mudders Sep 29 '22

Wtf? Why would someone who is transgender think that Russia would be a good place to go, let alone join their military?

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u/Matt3989 Sep 29 '22

I'm really scratching my head about the motivation here, the Major is very famously the first Trans Officer in the US Army. What on earth makes him want to support Russia? It's not exactly a bastion of Trans Rights.

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u/AzLibDem Sep 29 '22

It sounds like the wife was in control of the relationship:

"In a subsequent Aug. 24 meeting, she told the undercover agent her husband was a "coward" to be concerned about violating HIPAA, but she violated the law "all the time" and she would see to it that they could provide Russia with access to medical records from Fort Bragg patients."

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u/d01100100 Sep 29 '22

https://heavy.com/news/anna-gabrielian-jamie-lee-henry/

Gabrielian told the agent during an August 17 meeting she was “motivated by patriotism toward Russian” and would “provide any assistance she could to Russia, even if it meant being fired or going to jail.” During the meeting, Gabrielian told the undercover agent “Henry, a military officer, was currently a more important source for Russia than she was, since Henry had more helpful information, including on how the U.S. military establishes an army hospital in war conditions and about previous training the U.S. military had provided to Ukrainian military personnel.”

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u/gsfgf Sep 29 '22

Money? Being trans doesn't mean you can't also be a piece of shit.

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u/Nostra55 Sep 29 '22

It seems he was motivated by more than just money, he was saying he felt patriotic duty to Russia and was wanting to join the Russian military during the invasion of Ukraine.

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u/0uterspacepotatoman Sep 29 '22

How are they not being charged with acting as an unregistered agent of a foreign government? This was spy work they were doing. Making contact with a foreign agent to divulge sensitive domestic information.

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u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22

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u/[deleted] Sep 29 '22

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u/superanth Sep 29 '22

Apparently Henry had some reservations about providing healthcare data, saying it would violate the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the indictment says, but his wife had no hesitations.

They’re about to commit treason, and he’s worried about HIPAA??

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u/davesreddit123 Sep 29 '22

Why would someone in the us military have such patriotism towards Russia?

Fort Bragg is the home of Army special operations command so its a pretty big deal that this couple was trying to give Russia medical information.

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u/Donut_of_Patriotism Sep 29 '22

It’s beginning to look a lot like TREA-SON!

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u/qtx Sep 29 '22

From another news source:

Major Jamie Lee Henry, the Army's first trans officer, and Dr. Anna Gabrielian were indicted for trying to give secret records to the Russian government

You'd think a trans would hesitate in helping Puting, but here we are.

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u/3thirtysix6 Sep 29 '22

Right? Oh well, off to a black site with them.

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u/AtuinTurtle Sep 29 '22

What the holy hell is going on with our retired military personnel?! There seems to be an internal rot that needs to be addressed.

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u/Hyceanplanet Sep 29 '22

This is why the DOJ has to charge Trump -- if he is not held to account for much worse stealing of data, defence lawyers will keep pointing to that as a precedent.

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u/FotzeMan Sep 29 '22

Why would you do this?? Fucking traitors.

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u/qimike Sep 29 '22

Maximum punishment for both.

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u/GeorgeOnee Sep 29 '22

I will never understand this kind of behaviour, money worth nothing when you asked so…

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u/Ad_bonum_forum Sep 29 '22

Major Jamie Lee Henry is the name of the traitor.

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u/kaloonzu Sep 29 '22

Just a point of clarification: the major identifies as transgender, and considers themselves a woman. So its a lesbian couple aiding a virulently homophobic regime.

Fascinating.

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u/OnceMoreUntoDaBreach Sep 29 '22

Lolll just had a dude on my street arrested yesterday by feds, former NSA guy selling military health info to Russia.. problem was he sold it to another agent for crypto.

Burn these motherfuckers.

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u/Throwdaway543210 Sep 29 '22

The plot started after Russian President Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine.

The pair wanted to try to help the Russian government by providing them with data to help the Putin regime

Geebus. This is gonna trigger a huge Red Scare and October Red Hunt through the military.

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u/Poundbottom Sep 29 '22

gonna trigger a huge Red Scare and October Red Hunt through the military.

As it should.

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